Hold the press - the best easter wine and food match - Coq au vin and Madiran.

We really enjoyed the seafood paella and Chateau La Rayre Rosé on Good Friday (see earlier blog) and thought that could be THE easter wine and food match. However, upon returning home from camping decided to put together dinner from the pantry and the garden. In the garden we had last of the summer zucchini with flowers attached and the first of the autumnal field mushrooms, plus some fresh herbs. We had been wanting to try a jar of Comtesse du Barry Coq au Vin with Madiran Sauce. This is a very well respected product in France and recently available in Australia on-line at Hubert Gourmet in Perth (http://www.hubertgourmet.com.au/). At first look this looks like reasonably expensive product but it easily fed 2 adults and 2 children and at the end of the day it's a nicer and cheaper option than thai take-away. I stuffed the mushrooms with goats cheese, garlic and parsley and roasted them in the oven while reheating the coq au vin. Steamed the zucchini seasoned with salt and pepper and lemon rind. Then all was served with some couscous to mop up the delicious sauce of the coq au vin. Wow! great dinner and then there was the wine - Domaine du Crampilh Vielles Vignes Madiran 2006 which complimented and enhanced the coq au vin perfectly. The wines of this region date back to roman times and were made famous by pilgrims passing through the region. Winemakers of the region  draw on centuries of cumulated experience to ensure optimal viticulture practices, but modern techniques have brought out the best from this wine. It is made from 70% Tannat and 30% Cabernet Sauvignon. This wine is a beautiful deep purple colour. An intense and savoury nose with black fruits, vanilla and leather. A concentrated palate with rich black fruit and peppery spices balanced with great structure, fine chalky tannins and acid. Intense, powerful but great length and balance. This wine represents incredible value as this wine was awarded 2 stars in France’s prestigious wine guide, the Guide Hachette 2010. So I guess this comes down not to "paella v coq au vin" or "rose v madiran", but rather how the combination of the dish and the wine enhance each to create a memorable meal.

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